Beach Wedding Invitation Wording
Beach Wedding Invitation Wording

If you are planning a beach wedding, a nautical wedding, a destination wedding, or an outdoor wedding, we invite you to use our guide to put together unique wording for your wedding invitations.

Customarily, a wedding invitation contains specific information such as the couple’s names, the date, time and place of the wedding ceremony, and among other things, the names of the hosts. Below, we have broken down the invitation into sections to provide some guidelines and wording options for each part of the invitation.

Let's start with the fun stuff: beach or nautical themed wording!

BEACH OR NAUTICAL THEMED WORDING

This section is completely optional! Below is a selection of phrases that can be add to an invitation. Alternately, a few lines from a favorite poem, or a sentences or phrase of your own can be added. Check our Nautical, Sailing and Beach Expressions Pinterest board for inspiration.

Like a butterfly in a summer breeze,
our hearts are uplifted by love.

Love has left us all a-flutter!

Love fluttered into our hearts

Today, our love is given wings

Paradise found...

You don't need a ticket
or an advance reservation,
just make waves
to our wedding celebration.

Our course is set,
it's full speed ahead;
we're sailing toward,
the day we'll be wed!

"Anchors Aweigh!"
we'll be singing all day,
as we set sail for fun
at our wedding in the sun!

As unique as a seashell
as deep as the sea
As eternal as the waves
our love is meant to be

We set sail
for a much needed vacation,
and we tied the knot
in a tropical destination!

As precious as the ocean's treasures;
too strong for anyone to measure;
two hearts, joined together,
sharing their lives forever.

Walking on the beach together,
hand in hand we'll be forever.

We're hooked on each other...

We cast our lines
into the sea of love,
and we both hooked a keeper!

Gentle breezes stir your hair,
Moon reflections make your eyes glisten.
Winds whisper of the love we share,
and evening stars seem to listen.

Out of a love of nature
grew our love for each other

Like a butterfly in a summer breeze,
our hearts are uplifted by love.

Love has left us all a-flutter!

Love fluttered into our hearts

Paradise found...

You don't need a ticket
or an advance reservation,
just make waves
to our wedding celebration.

Today, our love is given wings


Our course is set,
it's full speed ahead;
we're sailing toward,
the day we'll be wed!

"Anchors Aweigh!"
we'll be singing all day,
as we set sail for fun
at our wedding in the sun!

As unique as a seashell
as deep as the sea
As eternal as the waves
our love is meant to be

We set sail
for a much needed vacation,
and we tied the knot
in a tropical destination!

As precious as the ocean's treasures;
too strong for anyone to measure;
two hearts, joined together,
sharing their lives forever.

Walking on the beach together,
hand in hand we'll be forever.

We're hooked on each other...

We cast our lines
into the sea of love,
and we both hooked a keeper!

Gentle breezes stir your hair,
Moon reflections make your eyes glisten.
Winds whisper of the love we share,
and evening stars seem to listen.

Out of a love of nature
grew our love for each other

Ocean waves will do the clapping,
as our vows we will say.

The sky will be our canopy,
on this our wedding day.
This day we begin
the adventure of a lifetime...

A perfect shell is a gift from the sea
as beautiful and unique
as our love is meant to be

His love is the sunshine
that keeps me warm
To me, she's the rainbow
after the storm
His love gave me wings
it has set me free
And wherever she is
that's where I want to be

You are my blue sky, my wind
and my rain;
to you I pledge my love undaunted.
Love washes in like the tide
soothing the parched sand...

Out of a love of nature
grew our love for each other

THE HOSTS OF THE WEDDING

A wedding invitation is issued by the host(s). Traditionally, the wedding invitation starts with the names of those issuing the invitation, traditionally the bride’s parents. Given today’s evolving family structures and financial dynamics, or cultural difference, this section is often the trickiest. Here are some guidelines to consider:

Bride’s Parents are Hosting: When the bride’s parents are hosting the wedding, begin with their names. If they follow the standard format, that would be Mr. and Mrs. {full name of father of bride}. If they have different surnames an “and” joins their full names. See examples:

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Michael Jones

or

Mr. Ernest Michael Jones and Sally Jane Smith

Titles such as Mr. and Mrs. are not spelled out. Titles other than Mr. and Mrs. are spelled out. The parent who has such a title is listed first. See examples:

Doctor and Mrs. Ernest Michael Jones

or

Doctor Sally Jane Jones and Mr. Ernest Michael Jones

For a less formal event or if you are looking to include the first name of a married woman, omit the courtesy titles. If you opt for this format, it is best to omit the middle names as well.

Groom's Parents are Hosting: When the groom’s parents are hosting the wedding, begin with their names. The same standard formats as above can be followed.

When both sets of parents are hosting the wedding, the names of the groom’s parents are added at the top of the invitation after the bride’s parents’ names. The same standard formats as above can be followed with the two sets of names joined together with either an “and” or a “together with”. See examples:

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Michael Jones and

Mr. and Mrs. Kevin John Williams

Or

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Michael Jones

together with

Mr. and Mrs. Kevin John Williams

If the groom’s parents are not co-hosting, but you would like to mention them, do so after the groom’s name preceded with “son of”.

Special Considerations: If the parents are divorced, the names are listed on separate lines without an “and” between them with the mother’s name listed first. If mom is remarried, her married name is used. According to old etiquette, stepparents are omitted; however, you can add them if you like. If you choose to include a stepparent, the name of the birth parent goes first.

Although traditionally a deceased parent is not included, many people feel strongly about honoring them by including them on their wedding invitations. The wording must be clear that the deceased parent is not issuing the invitation. Generally courtesy titles are omitted in this situation. See examples:

Including the deceased parent of the bride:

Angela Kate Jones (bride)

daughter of

Sally Jane Smith and the late Ernest Michael Jones

and

John James Williams (groom)

request the honour of your presence

at their wedding…

Including the deceased parent of the groom:

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Michael Jones

together with

Mrs. Christine Sandra Williams

request the honour of your presence

at the wedding of

Angela Kate Jones (bride)

and

John James Williams (groom)

son of

the late Mr. Kevin John Williams

The Couple is Hosting: When the couple is hosting the wedding, omit the names of the parents at the beginning. See examples:

The honour of your company

Is requested at the wedding of

Miss Angela Kate Jones

To

Mr. John James Williams

Or

Angela Kate Jones

and

John James Williams

request the pleasure of your company

at the celebration of their wedding

or

Angela Jones

and

John Williams

invite you to celebrate

their wedding

or

Because you have shared in our lives

by your friendship and love, we

Angela Kate Jones and John James Williams

invite you to share

the beginning of our new life together

when we exchange wedding vows

All Parties are Hosting: When all parties are hosting the wedding, the invitation can begin with “together with their parents” or “together with their families”. See examples:

Together with their parents

Angela Jones

and John Williams

invite you to celebrate

their wedding

or

Together with their families

Angela Kate Jones

and John James Williams

request the pleasure of your company

at the celebration of their wedding

THE INVITATION

Traditionally two phrases are used to indicate if the ceremony will be in a house of worship or not. Informal wording is also becoming very common. It is important here to be clear if the guest is invited to a wedding ceremony or the reception only.

If the ceremony is to take place at a place of worship, “request the honour of your presence” is used.

If the ceremony is to take place at a secular location, “request the pleasure of your company” is used.

For informal ceremonies, a phrase such as “would be delighted by your presence at the marriage of” or “invite you to share in the joy/celebration of the marriage of their daughter…” or “invite you to the wedding of…” can be used.

Note: The British spelling “honour” is most traditional, but the American spelling is just as correct. Keep it consistent throughout your wedding suite. If you use “honour” on your invitations, use “favour” on the reply card. If you use “honor” on your invitations, use “favor” on your reply card.

BRIDE AND GROOM LINES

The names of the bride and groom are set off on separate lines with the preposition linking them on its own line. Traditional American wording uses “to”; some formats use the word “and”.

If the bride’s parents are hosting the wedding and their names are listed first, traditionally the bride’s last name is not repeated and the courtesy title (Miss or Ms.) is omitted. The grooms full name is preceded with “Mr.”. See example:

Mr. Ernest Michael Jones and Sally Jane Smith

request the honour of your company

at the marriage of their daughter

Angela Kate

to

Mr. John James Williams…

For a more contemporary wording, or if both sets of parents are hosting, treat both names equally.



DATE AND TIME

The date and time of the wedding is generally spelled out with only the proper names (day of the week, month) capitalized. The year is traditionally omitted, but it is sometimes included for the invitation’s keepsake value. Don’t worry about using a.m. or p.m., or a phrase such as “in the afternoon” unless the wedding will be at 8, 9, or 10 o’clock. You can begin the line with the preposition “on” but it is not necessary. For a more contemporary format, in modern practice, numerals are used. See examples:

on Saturday, the seventh of March

at half after ten in the morning

or

Saturday, the seventh of March

two thousand and fifteen

at three o’clock

or

Saturday, March seventh

at three o’clock

or

March 7, 2015

at 3 p.m.

LOCATION OF CEREMONY

If you will be getting married in a location that is well known, traditionally only the name, city and state of the venue are included on the wedding invitation. Commas are not used at the ends of lines, and the state is spelled out.

If you will be using a street address, numerals are acceptable, but ZIP codes are omitted.

If you plan to include a direction card with your invitation, it is not necessary to include the street address of your venue on your invitation.


RECEPTION LINE OR CARD

If your ceremony and reception will be held at the same place, they can be on a single invitation. Wording such as “Reception to follow,” “Reception immediately following,” or “Dinner and dancing to follow” can be added.

If your reception will take place elsewhere, we recommend including a separate reception card with your wedding invitation. We offer several different options forenclosure cards. These can be useful if you would like to include the address.



R.S.V.P. LINE OR REPLY CARD

Traditionally wedding invitations included the address the R.S.V.P. should be sent to. The guests responded by writing a note on their own personal stationery. If you chose to include the R.S.V.P. line on your invitation, it goes in the lower left corner. You can include an address, phone number, email address, or website.

While some brides uphold this tradition, most choose to include a separate reply card with their wedding invitation. If you decide to use a reply card, you can choose a separate card with a self-addressed envelope or a postcard. (Tip: Guests sometimes forget to include their names on the reply card. To know who the reply card is from, number your guest list, and lightly pencil the proper number on the back of the reply card before tucking it into the addressed invitation.)